Monthly Archives: June 2010


At War With The Motorist: Superhighways

On At War With The Motorist, a short review of the London “cycle superhighways”, after a quick go on “CS3”.  They’re exactly what you’d expect from the sort of “super” infrastructure that can be installed for pennies within a couple of months of being announced: pointless.  Read it here.


Help! Help! I’m being repressed

(This is another archival repost of something written on the old blog a few years ago.) I’ve been catching up with about a month of blogosphere this weekend, after travelling, and other distractions. I managed to catch a discarded copy of G2 with Ben Goldacre’s homeopathy article, so I was […]


Lay Science: The Way The World Is

I’ve posted a quick review of The Way The World Is, physicist-vicar John Polkinghorne’s attempt at explaining to other scientists why he is a Christian.  It’s a tedious and embarrassing piece of work.  The book, that is.  The post, I hope, is at least entertainingly sarcastic.  Read it here.


New blog: At War With The Motorist

At War With The Motorist reports from the front line of the civil war for Britain’s city streets.  We will uncover the bollocks public transport, bullshit cycling infrastructure, bad town planning, and injustice, given out by the Motorist government and local authorities.  We’ll also be taking a skeptical, evidence-based, sometimes […]


Broadcast

This is an archival re-post of something written last summer on the old blog. Any Questions, one half of BBC Radio 4’s weekly foray into the realm of mindless US-style talk radio bigotry, this week invited a panel of historians, novelists, and journalists to share their poorly considered thoughts on […]


Journalology: Against green open access

Every time I blog about the future of science publishing and the opportunities for radical changes to the way science is conducted and disseminated, somebody comes along and leaves a comment telling me that the state of science publishing is perfect but one thing: the lack of “green” open access.  […]